The Great Depression by Gage Hammonds - Ourboox.com
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The Great Depression

  • Joined Apr 2016
  • Published Books 1

Herbert Hoover

The stock market crashed in October 1929, less than eight months into Herbert Hoover’s presidency. Hoover thought that the crash was part of a passing recession. Hoover worked excessively trying to fix the economy. He founded government agencies, encouraged labor harmony, supported local aid for public works, fostered cooperation between government and business in order to stabilize prices, and struggled to balance the budget. His worked focused on indirect relief from individual states and the private sector.  As the Depression grew worse, calls grew for increased federal government mediation and spending. Hoover refused to involve the government and give direct aid to citizens. He asserted that he cared for common Americans too much to destroy the country’s foundations with deficits and socialist institutions. He was defeated by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932.

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Hoovervilles

Hoovervilles are shantytowns built by unemployed and destitute people during the Depression of the early 1930s. Shantytowns appeared across the United States as unemployed citizens were evicted from their homes. As the Depression worsened, millions of Americans were faced with severe hardships, many looked to the federal government for help. When the government failed to provide relief, President Herbert Hoover was blamed for the unbearable economic and social conditions. The shantytowns became known as Hoovervilles.

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The New Deal

The New Deal was a series of programs put in play in the United States between 1933 and 1938. They included both laws passed by Congress well as presidential executive orders during the first term of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It aimed to restore some measure of dignity and prosperity to many Americans. Roosevelt’s New Deal permanently changed the federal government’s relationship to the U.S. populace. The New Deal employed millions in new government programs, provided social insurance programs to aid elders, and caused the government to take a more active role in the economy.

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Fireside Chats

From March 1933 to June 1944, Roosevelt addressed the American people in some 30 speeches broadcast via radio, speaking on a variety of topics from banking to unemployment to fighting fascism in Europe. Millions of people enjoyed these speeches because they found comfort in them and they renewed their confidence. These speeches became known as fireside chats.

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